Foraging behavior of
Black-backed and Three-toed woodpeckers
during spring and summer
in a Canadian boreal forest

Pascal Villard

Received December 15, 1992
Accepted September 8, 1994

Department of Zoology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2

Present Address: Faculté des Sciences, Laboratorie d'Ecologie, Bâtiment Mirande, B.P. 138, 21004 Dijon Cédex, France

 

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Villard, Pascal. 1994. Foraging behavior of Black-backed and Three-toed woodpeckers during spring and summer in a Canadian boreal forest. Canadian Journal of Zoology 72 (11):1957-1959.

 

Abstract

During one spring to summer study in a Canadian boreal forest, Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) were found to excavate mainly on logs and at the base of large-diameter tree trunks. In contrast, Three-toed Woodpeckers (Picoides tridactylus) preferred higher strata and smaller diameter trunks. The predominant foraging technique used by Three-toed Woodpeckers was bark scaling. Canadian Three-toed Woodpeckers showed foraging behavior similar to that found in European woodpeckers, but in the Nearctic range they have not fully developed the sap-licking behavior that is typical of the Three-toed Woodpeckers of the western Palearctic range.

 


 

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